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  1. #41
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    Default some 18th century Japanese stuff



    Last edited by L'Angelo d'Mysterioso; 01-25-2018 at 05:39 AM. Reason: changed me mind

  2. #42
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    Default more 18th Century Japanese art stuff


  3. #43
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    Default Edward Burne-Jones: The Legend of St George and the Dragon (1865–67)

    The greatest painter of the second generation of the Pre-Raphaelite movement, Sir Edward Coley Burne-Jones (or EBJ for short) was amazingly productive in a 40 year time span. He created numerous designs for stained glass windows and countless individual paintings, yet I am going to focus on the ambitious series of works he attempted which in my opinion, best typify the goals of the later Pre-Raphaelite movement.

    He attempted 5 series of combined paintings during his lifetime, these being The Legend of St George (as shown here), The Legend of Briar Rose, Days of Creation, Pygmalion and the Perseus Cycle. I will attempt to show all these works here when I can compile them as they are scattered across the world in some cases but stand better when viewed together rather than seen as individual pieces (as most books show them).

    So, introduction over, here are the paintings...




    Princess Sabra.



    The Petition to the King,



    The Princess Drawing the Lot.



    The Princess Sabra Led to the Dragon.




    The Princess Tied to a Tree.



    St George Slaying the Dragon (first version/study)



    St George Slaying the Dragon.




    The Return of the Princess.
    Last edited by L'Angelo d'Mysterioso; 02-10-2018 at 01:24 PM. Reason: Resizing, replacing and other words beginning with r...

  4. #44
    Chatmaster Wannabe
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    Default

    Hello ^^
    I wish I had a tiny bit of your talent
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  5. #45
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    Default Utagawa Kuniyoshi: Choko and Cho-Un.

    So, part of the reason why I stopped putting pictures up here for about 3 months is because I was only really working on one, this is that picture and it has been a pleasant nightmare (in as much as anything that can cause you to lose your hair, give you sleepless nights and drive you to a near nervous breakdown can be pleasant). Started it right after I completed the Gambit thing so that was the middle of August so it's been about 5 and a half months work with breaks in between so I'll leave it up to you to decide if I wasted my time or not...



    Canvas effect version.



    Alternate effect version.

  6. #46
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    Default Edward Burne-Jones: The Legend of The Briar Rose (1870 - 1890)

    A series of paintings portraying one moment in time in four different places from the story of Sleeping Beauty. EBJ attempted numerous version of this work beginning with his first attempt at the subject, the Small Briar Rose painted from 1871 to 1873, which is housed at the Museo de Arte de Ponce in Puerto Rico. This series only consists of 3 of the paintings, being The Prince in the Briar Wood, The Council Chamber and The Rose Bower.

    Then the second, famous series, consisting of 4 paintings from 1885 to 1890 and housed at Buscot Park which also included 10 joining panels which I am unable to find.

    Then a 3rd version of which I am unable to find a version of the Rose Bower, it again consisted of 3 paintings, this third Briar Rose Series is split between different museums of which I present the Council Chamber and Garden Court.

    The Small Briar Rose.



    Buscot Park Series.





    Third Briar Rose Series.

    Last edited by L'Angelo d'Mysterioso; 03-02-2018 at 08:13 AM. Reason: Ow! Me finger!

  7. #47
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    Default Alieffy

    I started this at the end of 2016 I believe and there are about 4 pencil sketch versions on volume 1.





    Soft and hard light canvas effect versions.
    Last edited by L'Angelo d'Mysterioso; 02-18-2018 at 03:18 PM. Reason: Reasons of a somewhat embarrasing grammatical nature

  8. #48
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    Default Edward Burne-Jones: The Perseus Cycle (1875-1890)

    EBJ's most ambitious work and frustratingly unfinished the Perseus Cycle consisted of 10 paintings, of which there are gouache (bodycolour) studies for all in various states of completion and 4 completed Oil paintings. I have combined them to demonstrate how the artist changed certain poses and details between the various versions, this also allows me to fit them all on one post instead of two or three. Anyway, the paintings...




    The Call of Perseus.




    Perseus and the Graiae.



    The Arming of Perseus.



    The Finding of Medusa.




    The Death of Medusa (left) The Birth of Pegasus and Chrysaor (right).



    The Rock of Doom.



    The Doom Fulfilled.




    The Baleful Head.


    There were two further paintings in the series, Perseus and Andromeda, which was created before he began work on the cycle and which later formed the basis for The Rock of Doom and The Doom Fulfilled. There was also Atlas Turned to Stone, which falls between the Birth of Pegasus and The Rock of Doom in the cycle but which I have excluded due to forums only allowing 8 pictures a post. They are only a Google search away though.
    Last edited by L'Angelo d'Mysterioso; 02-10-2018 at 12:10 PM. Reason: Sometimes there is no reason just madness and chaos...

  9. #49
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    Default



    ~waves~ LOves the art !
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  10. #50
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    Default Psyche Art Nouveau Recreation (Originally by Jan Toorop)



    This was originally a book cover in blue and white, I am doing it in gold as when the various effects are added it will be a more custard type yellow (I have no idea why my paint program does this when you add effects but it does).




    Effect version.
    Last edited by L'Angelo d'Mysterioso; 02-20-2018 at 04:25 AM. Reason: Banana and Chocolate milkshake...

  11. #51
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    Default

    Is the signature pic one of your efforts, too, Angelo?

    Me like, anyways!

  12. #52
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    Default

    Hardly, it's Ophelia by Arthur Hughes from 1852. In my dreams I will paint like that one day, but today is not that day.

    Last edited by L'Angelo d'Mysterioso; 02-21-2018 at 03:23 PM. Reason: Picture addition and text subtraction...

  13. #53
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    every piccy you post is beautiful ^5
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  14. #54
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by L'Angelo d'Mysterioso View Post
    Hardly, it's Ophelia by Arthur Hughes from 1852. In my dreams I will paint like that one day, but today is not that day. And the old guy sleeping with a beard is from the Council Chamber by Burne Jones (just so you know).
    Hope I don't come across as too much of a peasant when I say I'd never heard of Arthur Hughes before!

    My fave artists are Monet (once he'd established Impressionism), Van Gogh and Miro - with my three fave paintings (hope Chatmaster lets me copy em over) being:

    [IMG]https://upload.wikimedia.org/*********/commons/9/99/Water-Lilies-and-Japanese-Bridge-%281897-1899%29-Monet.jpg[/IMG]

    [IMG]http://3.bp.********.com/-1aPK-FHnrhI/Ve4agayTy4I/AAAAAAAABXU/LSOOE3HQEwI/s1600/Paris%2BMusee%2BD%2527Orsay%2BVincent%2Bvan%2BGogh %2B1888%2BStarry%2BNight%2Bover%2Bthe%2BRhone%2B1. jpg[/IMG]



    - - - Updated - - -

    Drat it didn't!

  15. #55
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    Default Der Blaue Reiter

    So Der Blaue Reiter (or The Blue Rider) was a short lived German art movement founded by Wassily Kandinsky that existed from 1911 to the outbreak of the First World War. It had no strict values nor did the artists involved follow any unified school of painting, total creative freedom of expression was the goal of this group.

    I have combined a collection of the artists works for this post, and it is thus somewhat haphazard, as some of the artists involved were extremely prolific while some others were not. The membership of artists in this movement was also somewhat fluid, due to clashes of temperament, it consisted of Russians and Germans, but it also included other Nationalities of artists for brief periods of time, so here we go with the pictures...

    Wassily Kandinsky




    Top row, left to right: Lady In Moscow (1912); Composition VI (1913); 293 (1913); Landscape with Rain (1913). Bottom row, left to right: Small Pleasures (1913); Composition VII (1913).

    Franz Marc


    Top Row (left to right): The Blue Horse (1911); Girl with Cat (1912); Mountains (1912); Tiger (1912). Second Row (Right to left): The Enchanted Mill (1913); St. Julian The Hospitaliser (1913)
    Fairy Animals (1913); Fabulous Beasts II (1913). Third Row (left to Right): The Unfortunate Land of Tyrol (1913); The Wolves (Balkan War) (1913). Bottom Row (left to Right): Deer in the Forest (1913); Deer in the Forest II (1914); Fate of the Animals (1914).

    Natalia Goncharova



    Top row (left to right): Sabbath (1912); Airplane over Train (1913); Cats (1913); Cyclist (1913); Middle Row (left to right): Dynamo Machine (1913) top; Electric Lamp (1913) bottom; Rayonist Lillies (1913); The Weaver (1913); Yellow and Green Forest (1913); Third Row (left to right): Composition (1914); Espagnole (1914); Liturgy, sketch of a costume (1914); Liturgy, six winged Seraph (1914);
    Liturgy, St. Andrew (1914); Liturgy, The Seraph's costume (1914); Bottom Row (left to right); ****erel (1914); Forest (Red-green) (1914); Rabbi with Cat (1912).


    Paul Klee



    (all 1914) Top row (left to right): Colour Shapes; Hammamet; Hammamet; Red and White Domes; Middle Row (left to right):
    Hammamet with Mosque; Remembrance of a Garden; Bottom Row (left to right): In the Style of Kairouan; Windows and Palm Trees; In the houses of St. Germain.

    Robert Delaunay



    Top row (left to right): The Eiffel Tower (1911); The Red Tower (1911); Eiffel Tower (1913); Middle Row (left to right): The City of Paris (1912); Window (1912); Rhythm (1912); Windows open Simultaneously (1912); Bottom Row (left to right); The Three Graces (1912); Woman with Umbrella (1913); Simultaneous Windows (1912); Homage to Bleriot (1914).


    August Macke



    Complicated but this goes in order of left to right, top to bottom: Couple in the woods (1912); Russian Ballet (1912); Big Zoo, Triptych (1913); Garden Restaurant (1912); Sunny Way (1913); Zoological Garden I (1913); Children and Sunny Trees (1913); Colourful Shapes (two versions) (1913); In Front of the Hat Shop (1913); People at the Blue Lake (1913); Promenade (1913); Woman with a Yellow Jacket (1913); Tightrope Walker (1914); Woman in a Green Jacket (1913); Fashion Store (1914); Farewell (1914); Girl in the Greenery (1914); At the Garden Table (1914); Dealer with Jugs (1914); In The Bazar (1914); In the Temple Hall (1914); Man with Donkey (1914); Market in Algiers (1914).


    Alexej von Jawlensky



    Top row (left to right):
    Portrait of a Woman (1912); Pale Woman with Red Hair (1912); Head in Blue (1912); Spanish Girl (1912). Bottom Row (left to right): The Thinking Woman (1912); Woman with a Green Fan (1912); Head in Black and Green (1913); The Blue Mantilla (1913).

    Albert Bloch & Others




    Top Row (left to right): Albert Bloch, Duel (1912); The Four Pierrots (1912); Summer Night (1913); The Green Dress (1913);
    Marianne von Werefkin, Catholic Church of St. Anne in Vilnius (1912);

    Second Row (left to right):
    Heinrich Campendonk, Still life with Head (1914); Man with Red Top Hat and Woman (1912); Bucolic Landscape (1913); The Balcony (1913); Emil Nolde, Candle Dancers (1912); The Missionary (1912); Gabriele Munter, Black Mask with Rose (1912);

    Third Row (left to Right): Lyonel Feininger, Bathers on The Beach (1912); Harbor Mole (1913); David Burliuk, Cossack Mamai (1912); Love and Peace (1914);

    Bottom Row (left to right): Lyonel Feininger, Cyclists (1912); On The Bridge (1913); David Burliuk, Landscape (1912).
    Last edited by L'Angelo d'Mysterioso; 02-28-2018 at 10:42 AM. Reason: Naming all the damn pictures...

  16. #56
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    Default

    ^^ lovely please don't critize yourself lol good to see you
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  17. #57
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    Default Untitled Experiment No.1




    Last edited by L'Angelo d'Mysterioso; 03-01-2018 at 07:11 AM. Reason: Bit pretentious, why don't you go back to drawing superheroes?...

  18. #58
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    Default Harlequin 1901 Revisited

    I began this almost a year ago now, the early version is post two on this thread and it is far too mannered and respectful when I look at it now so I repainted it. Two versions to choose from this time...






    You know it took Picasso about a day to paint this originally, right?
    Last edited by L'Angelo d'Mysterioso; 02-28-2018 at 09:46 AM. Reason: Don't even start...

  19. #59
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    Default Untitled Experiment No.2

    which for some reason I called No.6 when done originally. But yes, a pencil sketch of mine I'm painting over just because I felt the need to make something more out of it.



    btw, I know it's too flat in relation of the face and the hair and there is no contouring of the eyes and lips which broadens the face if you want to know why It looks strange, but it has a sort of amateur art deco feel to it.


    Untitled Experiment No.3





    For some reason of a undefined nature today has just been one of those days.
    Last edited by L'Angelo d'Mysterioso; 03-09-2018 at 06:55 AM. Reason: ...Well, I was only saying...

  20. #60
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    Default Pablo Picasso & Georges Braque: Partners in Cubism (1909-1914)

    Pablo Picasso & Georges Braque were well known before their meeting and subsequent partnership in 1909. Braque with his work in Impressionism and Fauvism, Picasso with his Blue and Rose Periods. The two had begun to experiment in a proto cubist style the year before but their partnership complimented and pushed each other to create their most challenging works. Slipping into hyperbole, there has never been a more influential artistic partnership in terms of influence and impact on the world of art.

    Early Cubism

    A selection of their work from their meeting in 1909 through to the beginning of 1911, alternating between artists so that the top row is Picasso, Braque, Picasso. The middle row is Braque, Picasso, Braque, with the bottom row being Picasso, Braque, Picasso.



    Analytical Cubism

    definition (from the tate website) analytical cubism describes the early phase of cubism, generally considered to run from 1910* - 1912, characterised by a fragmentary appearance of multiple viewpoints and overlapping planes.

    *date changed by myself

    The work produced by Picasso (Above) and Braque (Below) during the summer of 1911 in the Pyrenees, the pinnacle of their partnership and the paintings that shook the world...








    Synthetic Cubism

    definition (from the tate website) Synthetic cubism is the later phase of cubism, generally considered to run from about 1912 to 1914, characterised by simpler shapes and brighter colours.

    The final phase of their partnership saw Braque (Top) and Picasso (Below) feted by the art world and joined by fellow artists, notably Juan Gris and Jean Metzinger. The partnership was broken by the advent of the First World War when Braque, as a Frenchman, joined the Army. Picasso would continue to produce work throughout the War, but Braque did not produce another artwork until 1917.








    Following the end of The First World War, Picasso and Braque continued to produce cubist works yet it was not the same. Picasso was in the process of moving into surrealism and was losing interest in cubism, while Braque, who's work continued to be defined by cubist principles, was less harsh in subject matter and temperament.

    By 1920, Cubism was accepted by all as the primary style of the time and it had lost its ability to shock, being viewed as decorative art by Le Corbusier for example. Yet its influence was far reaching, with abstract art, Dada, Purism, Cubo Futurism, Constructivism and Neo Plasticism forming from or in reaction to it. Ultimately, without cubism, the freedom to express and deconstruct art and to view works as more than just pretty pictures would not have been as widely accepted, although, whether or not, this is a good thing I leave to you to decide.

    all artwork copyright 2018 by the estates of Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso and used under the provision of fair use.
    Last edited by L'Angelo d'Mysterioso; 03-09-2018 at 07:04 AM. Reason: ...Well, Shurrup! It's art i'nt it!

 

 
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